freud and the motherfuckers


23, pa res, gemini, catholic, bisexual, bipolar, irish lass with the mouth of a sailor, wishes she was a mermaid

 my lovey: wonderlandismymind

mah face  my body art  

Ask me anything

cutebabe:

floewering:

my little flower prince

im in love

Source: floewering

saltwaterandink:

quicksandbuddy:

Egyptian mythology is best mythology

ISIS
NO

saltwaterandink:

quicksandbuddy:

Egyptian mythology is best mythology

ISIS

NO

Source: lunacswitchyblog

I’ll never punish my daughter for saying no.

The first time it comes out of her mouth, I’ll smile gleefully. As she repeats “No! No! No!” I’ll laugh, overjoyed. At a young age, she’ll have mastered a wonderful skill. A skill I’m still trying to learn. I know I’ll have to teach her that she has to eat her vegetables, and she has to take a nap. But “No” is not wrong. It is not disobedience.

1. She will know her feelings are valid.
2. She will know that when I no longer guide her, she still has a right to refuse.

The first time a boy pulls her hair after she says no, and the teacher tells her “boys will be boys,” we will go to her together, and explain that my daughter’s body is not a public amenity. That boy isn’t teasing her because he likes her, he is harassing her because it is allowed. I will not reinforce that opinion. If my son can understand that “no means no” so can everyone else’s.

3. She owes no one her silence, her time, or her cooperation.

The first time she tells a teacher, “No, that is wrong,” and proceeds to correct his public school, biased rhetoric, I’ll revel in the fact that she knows her history; that she knows our history. The first time she tells me “No” with the purpose and authority that each adult is entitled, I will stop. I will apologize. I will listen.

4. She is entitled to her feelings and her space. I, even a a parent, have no right to violate them.
5. No one has a right to violate them.

The first time my mother questions why I won’t make her kiss my great aunt at Christmas, I’ll explain that her space isn’t mine to control. That she gains nothing but self doubt when she is forced into unwanted affection. I’ll explain that “no” is a complete sentence. When the rest of my family questions why she is not made to wear a dress to our reunion dinner. I will explain that her expression is her own. It provides no growth to force her into unnecessary and unwanted situation.

6. She is entitled to her expression.

When my daughter leaves my home, and learns that the world is not as open, caring, and supportive as her mother, she will be prepared. She will know that she can return if she wishes, that the real world can wait. She will not want to. She will not need to. I will have prepared her, as much as I can, for a world that will try to push her down at every turn.

7. She is her own person. She is complete as she is.

I will never punish my daughter for saying no. I want “No” to be a familiar friend. I never want her to feel that she cannot say it. She will know how to call on “No” whenever it is needed, or wanted.

— Lessons I Will Teach, Because the World Will Not — Y.S. (via poetryinspiredbyyou)

Source: poetryinspiredbyyou

Source: -norrington

maxkirin:

Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing, a remake of this post. Source.

Want more writerly content? Make sure to follow maxkirin.tumblr.com for your daily dose of writer positivity, advice, and prompts!

Source: maxkirin

anathe-matic:

sad-veins:

shybabykitten:

This kinda sounds like a poem


CABINETS OF WONDER SO MUCH LOVE FOR THIS

anathe-matic:

sad-veins:

shybabykitten:

This kinda sounds like a poem

CABINETS OF WONDER
SO MUCH LOVE FOR THIS

Source: loudest-whisper

katiegeewhiz:

I REALLY LOVE EVERYTHING ABOUT THIS

katiegeewhiz:

I REALLY LOVE EVERYTHING ABOUT THIS

Source: neilaglet


Rashida Jones and I have a game: We decide for three months how we’re going to dress, like Japanese Executive, Little House on the Prairie, Female Sailor on Leave. A couple of months ago, our look was Eighties Art Dealer: Black blazers with shoulder pads, high-waisted jeans, air-dried hair and big eyebrows.

Rashida Jones and I have a game: We decide for three months how we’re going to dress, like Japanese Executive, Little House on the Prairie, Female Sailor on Leave. A couple of months ago, our look was Eighties Art Dealer: Black blazers with shoulder pads, high-waisted jeans, air-dried hair and big eyebrows.

Source: imnotcranky

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go

Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

Source: psych2go

Source: rory-williams